Commercial Integrator May 2017 : Page 6

CI Editor’s Note ENOUGH WITH THE MILLENNIALS BASHING FIND ME HERE: @leblanctom @commintegrator facebook.com/ commintegrator BUSINESS LEADERS ACROSS ALL INDUSTRIES AND GENERATIONS should collec-tively look in the mirror and decide that enough is enough with the overt discrediting and diminishing of Millennial employees. It’s fine to criticize individuals who demonstrate an unearned sense of entitlement or unpro-fessionalism. It’s fine to draw a line in the sand when it comes to irresponsible or careless use of social media during company time. It’s fine to stand by company policies when it comes to work hours and when employees need to be in the office. What’s not fine is generalizing an entire group of people. That is never fine. We should all agree on that. There are now more Millennials, between ages 18 and 34, in the U.S. than Baby Boomers, making it the nation’s largest living generation, according to Pew Research Center. That 2016 research estimates Millennials at 75.4 million. That’s a lot of people to lump into a bucket. I find it surprising that so often at integration industry conferences the conversation devolves into Millennial bashing. During NSCA’s 19th annual Business & Leadership Confer-ence in March, Deloitte’s Cathy Benko delivered a keynote presentation in which she included a section listing Millennial employees’ ideals and characteristics. Much of what she said was complimentary (at least that’s how I interpreted it), but perception is everything. As she described her views on Millennial employees’ approaches to things like company loyalty and respect for higher-ups, there were matters of dismissive laughter from the crowd. At one point Benko indulged the frustration that many employers have with Millennial employees. She polled the audience on points of contention they have with young members of their organization. Once she roused the audience, she told them to “Get over it, because it’s not going anywhere.” That it’s not going anywhere is a good thing. Our CI Profile on ClearTech Media reflects a team with instrumental Millennial employees that was motivated to shift from project-to service-based revenue. The enthusiasm of the young staff was seen as a key driver of the tran-sition. It’s an example of why the integration industry should be embracing its next generation of leadership. The workplace has changed. Nobody knows that better than those in the integration indus-try. It’s not just the technology that has changed. A more digital environment has simply trans-formed the way people work. Young employees have different expectations when they enter the workforce than previous generations did. That should be obvious since they’re entering a workforce that offers different solutions. When you have issues with employees, take it up with them. Hold them accountable. Remember that your challenge relates to individuals, not an entire generation. Tom LeBlanc, Editor, tleblanc@ehpub.com MAY 2017 Young employees have different expectations when they enter the workforce than previous generations did. That should be obvious since they’re entering a workforce that offers different solutions. Find Content Like This Tagged … Recurring Revenue, Human Resources, Recruiting That’s My Take What’s Yours? Give us your two cents. Weigh in on commercial integrator.com FAVORITE BLOG EXCERPT It’s easy to sit behind a computer and conduct your business. But it is really through personal interaction — a face-to-face meeting, handshake, and the demonstration of thoughtfulness and consideration — that real bonds are formed. —Steve Greenblatt, Control Concepts Check out CI ’s bloggers at CommercialIntegrator.com 6 | COMMERCIAL INTEGRATOR May 2017 commercialintegrator.com

Editor’s Note

Tom LeBlanc

MAY 2017

ENOUGH WITH THE MILLENNIALS BASHING

Young employees have different expectations when they enter the workforce than previous generations did. That should be obvious since they’re entering a workforce that offers different solutions.

BUSINESS LEADERS ACROSS ALL INDUSTRIES AND GENERATIONS should collectively look in the mirror and decide that enough is enough with the overt discrediting and diminishing of Millennial employees.

It’s fine to criticize individuals who demonstrate an unearned sense of entitlement or unpro-fessionalism. It’s fine to draw a line in the sand when it comes to irresponsible or careless use of social media during company time. It’s fine to stand by company policies when it comes to work hours and when employees need to be in the office.

What’s not fine is generalizing an entire group of people. That is never fine. We should all agree on that.

There are now more Millennials, between ages 18 and 34, in the U.S. than Baby Boomers, making it the nation’s largest living generation, according to Pew Research Center. That 2016 research estimates Millennials at 75.4 million. That’s a lot of people to lump into a bucket.

I find it surprising that so often at integration industry conferences the conversation devolves into Millennial bashing. During NSCA’s 19th annual Business & Leadership Conference in March, Deloitte’s Cathy Benko delivered a keynote presentation in which she included a section listing Millennial employees’ ideals and characteristics. Much of what she said was complimentary (at least that’s how I interpreted it), but perception is everything. As she described her views on Millennial employees’ approaches to things like company loyalty and respect for higher-ups, there were matters of dismissive laughter from the crowd.

At one point Benko indulged the frustration that many employers have with Millennial employees. She polled the audience on points of contention they have with young members of their organization. Once she roused the audience, she told them to “Get over it, because it’s not going anywhere.”

That it’s not going anywhere is a good thing. Our CI Profile on ClearTech Media reflects a team with instrumental Millennial employees that was motivated to shift from project- to service-based revenue. The enthusiasm of the young staff was seen as a key driver of the transition. It’s an example of why the integration industry should be embracing its next generation of leadership.

The workplace has changed. Nobody knows that better than those in the integration industry. It’s not just the technology that has changed. A more digital environment has simply transformed the way people work. Young employees have different expectations when they enter the workforce than previous generations did. That should be obvious since they’re entering a workforce that offers different solutions.

When you have issues with employees, take it up with them. Hold them accountable. Remember that your challenge relates to individuals, not an entire generation.

Tom LeBlanc, Editor, tleblanc@ehpub.com

FAVORITE BLOG EXCERPT

It’s easy to sit behind a computer and conduct your business. But it is really through personal interaction — a face-to-face meeting, handshake, and the demonstration of thoughtfulness and consideration — that real bonds are formed. —Steve Greenblatt, Control Concepts

Read the full article at http://digital.commercialintegrator.com/article/Editor%E2%80%99s+Note/2763659/400983/article.html.

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